The Role of Art in a Movement

Even though the cage is made of gold, it's still a prison

Liliana Wilson's Even though the cage is made of gold, it's still a prison. Created in 1994 and printed on a postcard.

Wilson's artwork speaks on the issues that relate to Chicana feminism, female oppression, and the immigrant experience. Her works are inspired by other figureheads such as Gloria Anzaldúa who wrote about social justice and women's rights for Latinas.

La Voz de Esperanza

Liliana Wilson's Ofrenda. Featured on the cover of La Voz de Esperanza, 2015.

The photos depicted here are works of art created earlier in Wilson's life that illustrate personal stories regarding the struggles of assimilating and surrendering to a new culture. The messages that Wilson threaded through her art, followed greater mediums later in her life. For example, the canvas painting she created in 1994, "Even though the cage is made of gold, it's still a prison," was later printed on postcards for distribution by the Mexic-Arte Museum and sponsored by the Texas Commission on the Arts & City of Austin. Furthermore, the Voz de Esperanza, a news journal created by Chicana activists in San Antonio, featured one of Wilson's most famous works "Ofrenda."